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NKT cells bridge the gap between innate and adaptive immune cells

NKT cells, by which is meant specifically iNKT cells, interact with a variety of innate and adaptive immune cells to regulate the immune response. NKT cells interact with macrophages, neutrophils, B cells, NK cells, dentritic cells, and other T cells.

FIGURE 5 | Interactions between iNKT cells and other leukocytes.

The presentation of self or foreign lipid antigens facilitates cognate interactions between invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells and CD1d-expressing antigen-presenting cells (APCs), including dendritic cells (DCs), macrophages, neutrophils and B cells. This leads to iNKT cell activation and reciprocal APC activation or modulation. The major iNKT cell-derived cytokines that modulate the functions of the iNKT cell cognate partner during immune activation are shown. Both iNKT cell-derived factors and APC-derived factors can activate other cell types — such as natural killer (NK) cells and MHC-restricted T cells — in a CD1d-independent manner. For example, DCs activated by iNKT cells secrete interleukin-12 (IL-12) to transactivate NK cells, and they can also enhance the ensuing adaptive immune responses mediated by MHC-restricted T cells. CD40L, CD40 ligand; CXCL2, CXC-chemokine ligand 2; GM-CSF, granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor; IFNγ, interferon-γ; IL-12R, IL-12 receptor; TCR, T cell receptor; TNF, tumour necrosis factor.[1]

Reference

<pubmed>23334244</pubmed>| http://www.nature.com.wwwproxy0.library.unsw.edu.au/nri/journal/v13/n2/full/nri3369.html Nature Reviews Immunology]

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Citation: Brennan PJ, Brigl M, Brenner MB. (2013) nvariant natural killer T cells: an innate activation scheme linked to diverse effector functions. NATURE REVIEWS IMMUNOLOGY 13(2):101-17. doi: 10.1038/nri3369. Epub 2013 Jan 21.

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Reprinted by permission from Macmillan Publishers Ltd: [Nature Reviews Immunology] (Patrick J. Brennan, Manfred Brigl & Michael B. Brenner (2013) nvariant natural killer T cells: an innate activation scheme linked to diverse effector functions. NATURE REVIEWS IMMUNOLOGY 13(2):101-17. doi: 10.1038/nri3369. Epub 2013 Jan 21., copyright (2013)

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