Cytoskeleton - Microfilaments

From CellBiology

ANAT3231 Cell Biology online lectures from the 2017 course.

Cytoskeleton - Microfilaments

Adherens Junction
Epithelial cell microfilaments

This lecture introduces the smallest of the three cytoskeleton filament systems, the microfilaments.


This lecture will be presented by a guest expert lecturer Prof Peter Gunning.
With more than 150 papers in microfilament research
The guest lecturer will provide their own notes for this lecture.

Recent reviews

  • Kee AJ, Gunning PW, Hardeman EC. Diverse roles of the actin cytoskeleton in striated muscle. J Muscle Res Cell Motil. 2009;30(5-6):187-97. Epub 2009 Dec 8. PMID: 19997772
  • Gunning PW, Schevzov G, Kee AJ, Hardeman EC. Tropomyosin isoforms: divining rods for actin cytoskeleton function. Trends Cell Biol. 2005 Jun;15(6):333-41. Review. PMID: 15953552 PDF

Recent Article

  • Bach CT, Schevzov G, Bryce NS, Gunning PW, O'Neill GM. Tropomyosin isoform modulation of focal adhesion structure and cell migration. Cell Adh Migr. 2010 Apr-Jun;4(2):226-34. Epub 2010 Apr 7.

PMID: 20305380

Orderly cell migration is essential for embryonic development, efficient wound healing and a functioning immune system and the dysregulation of this process leads to a number of pathologies. The speed and direction of cell migration is critically dependent on the structural organization of focal adhesions in the cell. While it is well established that contractile forces derived from the acto-myosin filaments control the structure and growth of focal adhesions, how this may be modulated to give different outcomes for speed and persistence is not well understood. The tropomyosin family of actin-associating proteins are emerging as important modulators of the contractile nature of associated actin filaments. The multiple non-muscle tropomyosin isoforms are differentially expressed between tissues and across development and are thought to be major regulators of actin filament functional specialization. In the present study we have investigated the effects of two splice variant isoforms from the same alpha-tropomyosin gene, TmBr1 and TmBr3, on focal adhesion structure and parameters of cell migration. These isoforms are normally switched on in neuronal cells during differentiation and we find that exogenous expression of the two isoforms in undifferentiated neuronal cells has discrete effects on cell migration parameters. While both isoforms cause reduced focal adhesion size and cell migration speed, they differentially effect actin filament phenotypes and migration persistence. Our data suggests that differential expression of tropomyosin isoforms may coordinate acto-myosin contractility and focal adhesion structure to modulate cell speed and persistence.


Lecture Slides

Links below are to PDF versions of the lecture powerpoint slides. Print these and bring to the lecture.



2012 Course Content

Lectures: Cell Biology Introduction | Cells Eukaryotes and Prokaryotes | Cell Membranes and Compartments | Cell Nucleus | Cell Export - Exocytosis | Cell Import - Endocytosis | Cell Mitochondria | Cell Junctions | Cytoskeleton Introduction | Cytoskeleton - Intermediate Filaments | Cytoskeleton - Microfilaments | Cytoskeleton - Microtubules | Extracellular Matrix 1 | Extracellular Matrix 2 | Cell Cycle | Cell Division | Cell Death 1 | Cell Death 2 | Signal 1 | Signal 2 | Stem Cells 1 | Stem Cells 2 | 2012 Revision | Development


Laboratories: Introduction to Lab | Microscopy Methods | Preparation/Fixation | Immunochemistry | Cell Knockout Methods | Cytoskeleton Exercise | Confocal Microscopy | Microarray Visit | Tissue Culture 1 | Tissue Culture 2 | Stem Cells Lab | Stem Cells Analysis



2012 Projects: Group 1 | Group 2 | Group 3 | Group 4 | Group 5 | Group 6 | Group 7 | Group 8 | Group 9

Dr Mark Hill 2015, UNSW Cell Biology - UNSW CRICOS Provider Code No. 00098G