User:Z3293267

From CellBiology

Lab Attendance

Week 1

--Z3293267 (talk) 15:11, 14 March 2013 (EST)

Week 2

--Z3293267 (talk) 15:50, 21 March 2013 (EST)

Week 3

--Z3293267 (talk) 15:45, 28 March 2013 (EST)

Week 4

--Z3293267 (talk) 15:07, 11 April 2013 (EST)

Week 5

--Z3293267 (talk) 15:06, 18 April 2013 (EST)

Week 6

--Anzac Day

Week 7

--Z3293267 (talk) 15:15, 2 May 2013 (EST)

Week 8

--Z3293267 (talk) 16:26, 9 May 2013 (EST)

Week 9

--Absent

Week 10

--Z3293267 (talk) 15:14, 23 May 2013 (EST)

Week 11

--Z3293267 (talk) 15:04, 30 May 2013 (EST)

Week 12

--Z3293267 (talk) 15:09, 6 June 2013 (EST)

Individual Assessments

Lab 1 - Introduction to Lab

Internal Link

2013 Lab 1

Lecture 1 Lecture 2

External Link

PubMed [1]

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?otool=iauunswlib

Insert Image

Animal Cell vs Plant Cell.

Red White Blood cells 01.jpg

Lab 1 Individual Assessment Exercise

Upload an image from a Journal listed on the References page or from Biomed Central (http://www.biomedcentral.com) or PLOS Journal (http://www.plos.org/publications/journals) from a recent article image that relates to the difference between prokaryotes and eukaryotic cells. Excluding the journal PLOS One as we used this in the class exercise.

Genomes and membranes in eukaryotes and prokaryotes.jpg

Genomes and Membranes in Eukaryotes and Prokaryotes.

Nick Lane Energetics and genetics across the prokaryote-eukaryote divide. Biol. Direct: 2011, 6;35 PubMed 21714941


Copyright ©2011 Lane; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Lab 2 - Microscopy Methods

Lab 2 Individual Assessment Exercise

Identify a recent research article (not review) that uses either confocal microscopy or super-resolution microscopy as one of the study's techniques. Explain briefly (1 paragraph) how the microscopy technique specifically contributed to the article's findings.

Daniel Torres-Lagares, Ramón Rodríguez-Martos, Lizett Castellanos-Cosano, Rosa Yáñez-Vico, Juan-José Segura-Egea, José-Luis Gutiérrez-Pérez Confocal microscopy: a valid approach to evaluate the three-dimensional characteristics of root-end cavities. Med Oral Patol Oral Cir Bucal: 2013, 18(3);e542-6 PubMed 23524419

[1]

The particular research article[1] (25/3/13) focuses on root-end cavity preparations while using confocal microscopy. They first gathered sets of teeth that were affected by a single cavity and were then prepared accordingly for the experiment. Each tooth was installed with ultrasonic tips which would work in conjunction with the confocal microscopy. With this, it can determine it's area, perimeter, circularity and cavosurface angle by providing a three-dimensional representation of the cavity. The research article ends by noting that confocal microscopy is a useful approach to study the three-dimensional characteristics of the root-end cavity.[1]


--Mark Hill (talk) 11:03, 11 April 2013 (EST) This research paper does use confocal microscopy for the analysis. I would prefer a cell biology topic, you have though explained how this technique contributed to the study. It is not clear to me that you understand why this technique (and not another) was more useful in the analysis.

Genomes and Membranes in Eukaryotes and Prokaryotes.[2]

On your own student page and the Lab 1 uploaded image update the reference using the Pubmed formatting shown in the practical class tutorial (see also 2013 Group Test Project http://cellbiology.med.unsw.edu.au/cellbiology/index.php?title=2013_Group_Test_Project).

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 Daniel Torres-Lagares, Ramón Rodríguez-Martos, Lizett Castellanos-Cosano, Rosa Yáñez-Vico, Juan-José Segura-Egea, José-Luis Gutiérrez-Pérez Confocal microscopy: a valid approach to evaluate the three-dimensional characteristics of root-end cavities. Med Oral Patol Oral Cir Bucal: 2013, 18(3);e542-6 PubMed 23524419
  2. Nick Lane Energetics and genetics across the prokaryote-eukaryote divide. Biol. Direct: 2011, 6;35 PubMed 21714941

Lab 3 - Preparation/Fixation

Lab 3 Individual Assessment Exercise

Select an image related to your selected topic sub-section (this can be from one of the 4 above or from elsewhere). The image should be uploaded (with all the required information: description, reference, copyright and student template) and pasted onto the project page sub-section and onto your own personal page.



--Mark Hill Images deleted due to copyright. NIH granting requires an author copy of the manuscript to be lodged with PMC, this does not mean that you can reuse the material and you should have looked at the Journal page for copyright information.

Publication Date (Web): December 16, 2009 Copyright © 2009 American Chemical Society


File:Early Stages of Cytokinesis.jpg

File:Early Cytokinesis in HeLa Cell.jpg



Select 4 reference papers related to your selected topic sub-section. Read these papers and write a brief description of their findings and relevance to the selected topic sub-section. The reference along with your description should then be pasted on both your group discussion page and your own personal page.

Introduction

G Ekin Atilla-Gokcumen, Adam B Castoreno, Sofia Sasse, Ulrike S Eggert Making the cut: the chemical biology of cytokinesis. ACS Chem. Biol.: 2010, 5(1);79-90 PubMed 20014865

This review goes over the basics of what cytokinesis is and discusses the use of small molecule probes to disturb cytokinesis, as well as the role naturally occurring small molecule metabolites such as lipids play during cytokinesis.

History

R Rappaport Cytokinesis in animal cells. Int. Rev. Cytol.: 1971, 31;169-213 PubMed 4400359

This book traces the history of some of the major ideas in the field and gives an account of our current knowledge of animal cytokinesis. It contains descriptions of division in different kinds of cells and the proposed explanations of the mechanisms underlying the visible events. The author also describes and explains experiments devised to test cell division theories. The forces necessary for cytokinesis now appear to originate from the interaction of linear polymers and motor molecules that have roles in force production, motion and shape change that occur in other phases of the biology of the cell. The localization of the force-producing mechanism to a restricted linear part of the subsurface is caused by the mitotic apparatus, the same cytoskeletal structure that insures orderly mitosis.

Current/Future Research

Takeshi Fujiwara, Madhavi Bandi, Masayuki Nitta, Elena V Ivanova, Roderick T Bronson, David Pellman Cytokinesis failure generating tetraploids promotes tumorigenesis in p53-null cells. Nature: 2005, 437(7061);1043-7 PubMed 16222300

This review discusses how chemical biology approaches have been very useful in understanding different aspects of the mechanism of cytokinesis. In the first part, the article focused on small molecules as biological probes. In addition to their use as probe compounds, however, small molecules also have therapeutic potential. One would expect small molecules that target cytokinesis to be important in the development of cancer therapeutics because improperly regulated cell division can be a cause or a consequence of cancer.


Elizabeth A Harrington, David Bebbington, Jeff Moore, Richele K Rasmussen, Abi O Ajose-Adeogun, Tomoko Nakayama, Joanne A Graham, Cecile Demur, Thierry Hercend, Anita Diu-Hercend, Michael Su, Julian M C Golec, Karen M Miller VX-680, a potent and selective small-molecule inhibitor of the Aurora kinases, suppresses tumor growth in vivo. Nat. Med.: 2004, 10(3);262-7 PubMed 14981513

This article shows the use of the mechanism of cytokinesis and develops more small molecule probes targeting different proteins within cytokinesis, anticpating that it will soon be possible to explore the potential drugs of cytokinesis. With the uses of aurora kinase inhibitors, which target both mitosis and cytokinesis, the mechanism cn be used to kill cancer cells.

Lab 4 - Immunochemistry

Lab 4 Individual Assessment Exercise

Identify an antibody against an adhesion junction protein that is commercially available.

Anti-beta Catenin antibody (ab16051)

Add a link to the original data sheet page and identify the type of adhesion junction.

http://www.abcam.com/beta-catenin-antibody-ab16051.html

http://www.abcam.com/beta-Catenin-antibody-ab16051.pdf

Beta-catenin is an adherens junction protein. Adherens junctions (AJs; also called the zonula adherens) are critical for the establishment and maintenance of epithelial layers, such as those lining organ surfaces. AJs mediate adhesion between cells, communicate a signal that neighbouring cells are present, and anchor the actin cytoskeleton. In serving these roles, AJs regulate normal cell growth and behavior. At several stages of embryogenesis, wound healing, and tumor cell metastasis, cells form and leave epithelia. This process, which involves the disruption and reestablishment of epithelial cell-cell contacts, may be regulated by the disassembly and assembly of AJs. AJs may also function in the transmission of the 'contact inhibition' signal, which instructs cells to stop dividing once an epithelial sheet is complete.

Include the following information: type of antibody (polyclonal, monoclonal), species raised in, species reacts against, types of application uses, and if available any reference using that antibody.

Type of antibody: Polyclonal

Species raised in: Rabbit

Species reacts against: Mouse, Rat, Human, Xenopus laevis, Squirrel

Types of application uses: Western Blotting, Immunocytochemistry, Immunohistochemistry, Sandwich ELISA

Reference using that antibody: Santosh Hunasgi, Anila Koneru, Dinesh Singh Chauhan, Yadavalli Guruprasad Rare giant granular cell ameloblastoma: a case report and an immunohistochemical study. Case Rep Dent: 2013, 2013;372781 PubMed 23533826


Lab 6 - Cytoskeleton Exercise

Analysis of Morphological Phenotypess in Tropomyosin 4 Overexpressing B35 Neuro-Epithelial Cells

Phenotype Graph.png

Lab 6 Individual Assessment Exercise

Do you see any changes in phenotypes between group A and group B?

There is some evidence of changes in phenotype when comparing group A(Tm4 overexpressing neuroepithelial cells) to those in B (Control neuroepithelial cells). Group A showed more prevalent phenotype of "pronged" phenotype and "stringed" phenotype. Whereas those in group B presented more "broken fan" phenotype and "stumped" phenotype. This would mean group A has more branching, more processes and longer processes compared to group B.

If you see a difference, speculate about a potential molecular mechanism that has led to the change. If you don't see a change, speculate why that could be.

The development of particular cell structures is regulated by the various isoforms of tropomyosin(Tm4). The results of this experiment suggest that Tm4 plays a critical role in the growth of neurites, leading to an increase in the pronged and stringed phenotypic stages. This would explain the differences observed between these cells and the control cells. Therefore, through regulation of the organisation of actin filaments, overexpression of Tm4 in B35 cells would lead to increased actin filaments and consequently, increased budding of processes/elongation of existing processes.

Lab 8 - Tissue Culture

Lab 8 Individual Assessment Exercise

Group 1

Introduction

  • it's a little long but I do remember Dr. Mark Hill saying this is a complicated subject.
  • It does need a picture just to grab our attention.
  • Get rid of the Dr. Mark Hill that's been there for a month =)

History

  • Good colours, very easy on the eyes.
  • Still some work to be done.
  • Maybe a picture of one of the scientist could be very nice.

Entry into M-phase

  • I feel it goes straight into the topic without a real explanation at the start. It is catered to uni students than high school students so we should have pre-knowledge, but maybe a strong start.
  • The rest of the section is nice to read and easy to learn.
  • Missing references.

Metaphase to Anaphase Transition

  • I'm going to assume the words in the brackets are just notes and are going to be followed up later as a paragraph.
  • Reading it, it looks like it's lacking information. Though, you don't want to overcomplicate it so I can understand the simplicity.
  • Needs an image.

Mitogens and Cell Division

  • Definition doesn't need to start. You can just add it into the paragraph or can add a glossary section for that.
  • It's very detailed so I can't help notice that it could use more references to back up the info.

Disease

  • Obviously it's going to come together later.
  • I would like to see some pictures for each disease in the table, that would really be nice.
  • Metaphasecolchicine.jpeg is not copyrighted or referenced properly at all. There is no info and needs to be fixed ASAP due to copyright infringement.

Current and Future Research

  • Have you thought of possibly putting this section into a table form? It could break up the text and be much easier to read.

Formatting Issues

  • All images should have at least one sentence described in the uploader's words and a signature at the end.
  • Reference 20 has come out blank because of the line used,<ref><pubmed>NBK268776</pubmed></ref>, though if I input <ref><pubmed>268776</pubmed></ref> it comes out as a different article which I think does not relate to the subject: [1]. You might have to backtrack the exact article that you were trying to reference.
  • Repeated references in the "References" section. To fix this issue, you have to go back to when the first time you used the reference. At the moment it looks like this:

<ref><pubmed>XXXXX</ref></pubmed>

You have to give the reference a name, to do this change the first line like so:

<ref name="PMIDXXXXX"><pubmed>XXXXX</ref>

It's preferable to rename the reference under the PMID to avoid confusion. From there, to continue using the same reference you have to type and replace this simple line:

<ref name="PMIDXXXXX"/>

This will clean up the reference list and avoid the repeated reference. Note that if you reorganise page content, ensure that the first instance of the reference has the ref name tag <ref name="PMIDXXXXX">.

  • You need at least one student drawn picture.

"Note that the group project requires the inclusion of at least one student drawn image (from the group)."

Refer to this part of the website for tips: http://cellbiology.med.unsw.edu.au/cellbiology/index.php?title=Cell_Biology_Image_Tutorial#Making_Your_Own_Image


  • For all images you should put it in a thumb picture so you can provide a quick explanation and also use the reference line after that description. It should look like this:

[[File:picture.jpg|thumb|short description of picture being displayed<ref><pubmed>XXXXX</ref></pubmed>]]

  • All references should be directly after the full stop (it's a little format issue but will be noticed).
  • Needs more images, I know it can be hard finding images with copyright being the main issue but there are other ways to get some relevant pictures:

Group 3

Title

  • Really should not use all caps. I feel it kind of disrupts the whole page.
  • Drop the "The". Just "Golgi Apparatus". It's cleaner. (I may have quoted a movie)

Introduction

  • Swap the Golgi apparatus Q+A.png with Golgi apparatus.png. This represents the true golgi that we know and provides a great pic to start. Make the image bigger.

Structure

  • Have you thought about putting this into table form? Possible list one structure of the golgi then the description right beside it. The info is great but it would make it a lot easier to read.

Function

  • Really well done section.
  • I would say get an image, but finding a relevant picture would be difficult. It's also nice and short so maybe unnecessary.

History

  • Great colours, easy on the eyes.
  • Get a pic of Camillo Golgi would be really neat.

Morphology and Molecular Mechannisms

  • I feel this is the best section. Easy to read, nice flow of pictures (left to right).
  • Needs the proofread. Spelling errors and punctuation errors that can easily be fixed.

Models

  • Here is my biggest issue. Why is there so many headings describing Models? We have: Models of Division, Current Model for Behaviour during Mitosis, Continued Presence via Mitotic Fragmentation of the Golgi Ribbon, Disappearance via The Golgi-ER Transport Model, Limitations of Current Models, Continued Presence Model and Disappearance Model. Should there be that much focus on Models? What about how the transportation works or a Mechanism section?

Formatting Issues

  • From the headings, you have used =Heading= (one equal sign) when I believe you are suppose to use ==Heading== (double equal sign). The former is dedicated for the topic name.
  • Model for Golgi during mitosis.jpg and Microtubule formation around the golgi during mitosis.jpg do not have copyright disclaimer. This is actually quite disastrous so please fix it ASAP.
  • Repeated references in the "References" section. To fix this issue, you have to go back to when the first time you used the reference. At the moment it looks like this:

<ref><pubmed>XXXXX</ref></pubmed>

You have to give the reference a name, to do this change the first line like so:

<ref name="PMIDXXXXX"><pubmed>XXXXX</ref>

It's preferable to rename the reference under the PMID to avoid confusion. From there, to continue using the same reference you have to type and replace this simple line:

<ref name="PMIDXXXXX"/>

This will clean up the reference list and avoid the repeated reference. Note that if you reorganise page content, ensure that the first instance of the reference has the ref name tag <ref name="PMIDXXXXX">.

  • All images need at least one paragraph or sentence described in the uploader's words explaining the image, afterwards signed with the signature.
  • Student drawn image isn't formatted properly. It needs at least one reference where it found it's inspiration from. Also need to include this info:

Copyright Beginning six months after publication, I (zXXXXXX) grant the public the non-exclusive right to copy, distribute, or display the Work under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license, as described at http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/ and http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/legalcode

Drawn by student zXXXXXX

{{Student Image}}

  • For all images you should put it in a thumb picture so you can provide a quick explanation and also use the reference line after that description. It should look like this:

[[File:picture.jpg|thumb|short description of picture being displayed<ref><pubmed>XXXXX</ref></pubmed>]]

  • All references should be directly after the full stop (it's a little format issue but will be noticed).
  • Needs more images, I know it can be hard finding images with copyright being the main issue but there are other ways to get some relevant pictures.

Group 4

Introduction

  • You don't need to start with definitions, especially basic terms. Cell division and mitosis? This is suppose to be catering to university levels so it should be already assumed knowledge.
  • Should started with the basic definition of spindle apparatus and quick breakdown of what to expect of the wiki page.
  • Dare I say, too many images. Especially for the beginning. Pick between Mitosis Spindles DJ-Sharp.gif and Microtubules-spindles-metaphase-jane.jpg because one image should only be there.
  • Remove the Gallery section, it feels out of place.
  • This section should of been a simple one paragraph with one image introducing the topic and it does let down the rest of the page because how it messy it is.

Historical Research

  • Remove the subheading, unnecessary.
  • Nice colours which makes it easier to read.
  • Long and detailed in some timelines, while a single sentence in others. Maybe the long ones can be simplified, but if you believe it's all important then leaving it's just fine.
  • Maybe some pictures of the scientists that made the discoveries.

Structure

  • This section is done well. Nice detailed info.
  • The images are lined up nicely. (left to right)

Function

  • Very detailed info and separated nicely.
  • Does need images but finding a relevant image does seem difficult given some the headings.

Mechanism of Formation

  • Very easy to read and I did learn a few things.
  • Put the Search and Capture Model.jpg a bit higher and put Comparing Spindle Models.jpg to the left would make this section much more accessible.

Current research

  • Swap this section with Complications.
  • All subheadings should be capitalised.
  • Provide a Future Research section.
  • One reference is 5 years old, which is too long to be considered current.
  • I can't help feeling that usually Current Research sections should be brief and simple explanation what the scientists are trying to achieve. Maybe a bit too detailed for my liking.

Complications

  • Swap this section with Current Research.
  • Microencephaly and Lissencephaly don't have the right formatting for headings. Possibly use ====Lissencephaly==== or '''Lissencephaly'''

Formatting Issues

  • Repeated references in the "References" section. To fix this issue, you have to go back to when the first time you used the reference. At the moment it looks like this:

<ref><pubmed>XXXXX</ref></pubmed>

You have to give the reference a name, to do this change the first line like so:

<ref name="PMIDXXXXX"><pubmed>XXXXX</ref>

It's preferable to rename the reference under the PMID to avoid confusion. From there, to continue using the same reference you have to type and replace this simple line:

<ref name="PMIDXXXXX"/>

This will clean up the reference list and avoid the repeated reference. Note that if you reorganise page content, ensure that the first instance of the reference has the ref name tag <ref name="PMIDXXXXX">.

  • All images need at least one paragraph or sentence described in the uploader's words explaining the image, afterwards signed with the signature.
  • You need at least one student drawn picture.

"Note that the group project requires the inclusion of at least one student drawn image (from the group)."

Refer to this part of the website for tips: http://cellbiology.med.unsw.edu.au/cellbiology/index.php?title=Cell_Biology_Image_Tutorial#Making_Your_Own_Image

  • For all images you should put it in a thumb picture so you can provide a quick explanation and also use the reference line after that description. It should look like this:

[[File:picture.jpg|thumb|short description of picture being displayed<ref><pubmed>XXXXX</ref></pubmed>]]

  • All references should be directly after the full stop (it's a little format issue but will be noticed).

Group 5

Introduction

  • Very simple and clear introduction.
  • Probably don't need to reference Hetzer(2010) as it is a review article which isn't the best. Just not mentioning it would be fine.
  • I had a little issue with the topic "The Nuclear Envelope During Cell Division" but I can understand that the whole purpose was to explain the tie-in with cell division.

Historical Background

  • I like the colours used for the table.
  • The dates are nice and spread out.
  • Maybe provide a picture of one of the main scientists that made a landmark discovery.

Structure of the Nuclear Envelope

  • Outer Nuclear Membrane only has one sentence. Looking at the actual wikipedia of Nuclear Envelope, it actually has 2 sentences. There should be more info included under this sub-heading.
  • Put the last line, Figure 1. Schematic view of model adopted for the NPC/NE system, underneath the picture.
  • Again with the intro, don't write mention review articles. Really should be using research articles if you are going to mention a name. The simple wiki reference format will suffice.

Cell Division

  • There is a lot of text in this section. Admittedly, I did not manage to finish reading the whole section cause I am overwhelmed at the amount of info. Maybe, structure the headings differently. If I wanted to learn about nuclear envelope during cell division I think a simple heading of Cell Division would be better. From there, you can talk about what happens before, during and after under that section. At the moment, we have Mitotic Functions in the middle and it breaks the flow.

Open vs. Closed/Semi-closed Mitosis

  • You don't need to start with the definition of mitosis. This wiki page is to cater to university level and this would be assumed knowledge.
  • This section maybe should be higher. It's a well done section and is very important because this is a real link to nuclear envelope and cell division but can't help it feels out of place down the bottom.

Abnormalities in Nuclear Envelope Breakdown and Reformation

  • Is there any more abnormalities associated with nuclear envelope? Is it possible that different abnormalities happen during breakdown compared to reformation?

Formatting Issues

  • Some of the references are not done properly. Looking at the line used for example, <ref name=PMID834491><pubmed>PMID834491</pubmed></ref> should just look like <ref name=PMID834491><pubmed>834491</pubmed></ref>. Can be easily fixed.
  • Repeated references in the "References" section. It looks like some people in the group know how to fix this.
  • You need at least one student drawn picture.

"Note that the group project requires the inclusion of at least one student drawn image (from the group)."

Refer to this part of the website for tips: http://cellbiology.med.unsw.edu.au/cellbiology/index.php?title=Cell_Biology_Image_Tutorial#Making_Your_Own_Image

  • For all images you should put it in a thumb picture so you can provide a quick explanation and also use the reference line after that description. It should look like this:

[[File:picture.jpg|thumb|short description of picture being displayed<ref><pubmed>XXXXX</ref></pubmed>]]

  • All references should be directly after the full stop (it's a little format issue but will be noticed).
  • Needs more images, I know it can be hard finding images with copyright being the main issue but there are other ways to get some relevant pictures.

--Z3293267 (talk) 19:56, 22 May 2013 (EST)

Group 6

Introduction

  • So you purposely removed the "Contents" bar at the start which I recommend not doing. If people don't like it, there's a simple click on "hide" that will minimise it for you.
  • There is absolutely no copyright or reference to the image Cell in anaphase.jpeg. Fix it ASAP or it'll get deleted.
  • You need to briefly introduce the subject and then gloss over what the wiki page will be focusing on.

Meiosis versus mitosis

  • History should of came before this section.
  • Possible set this in table format.

History of Anaphase

  • Not referenced properly. You've linked to outside websites instead of using the <ref></ref> format, so it won't show below in the References section.
  • The dark colours might be difficult for others to read.

Formatting Issues

  • There is absolutely no copyright or reference to the image Cell in anaphase.jpeg. Fix it ASAP or it'll get deleted.
  • There is no reference Celldivision decoration nonspecific.jpg, therefore you can't use this image because of the copyright disclaimer stating to attribute to the original author. There is also a lot of spelling errors. Please fix.
  • Student images should contain the disclaimer:

"Beginning six months after publication, I (student number) grant the public the non-exclusive right to copy, distribute, or display the Work under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license, as described at http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/ and http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/legalcode."

And also add the template: {{Student Image}}.

  • Spindle fiber.jpg is missing the reference.
  • Repeated references in the "References" section. To fix this issue, you have to go back to when the first time you used the reference. At the moment it looks like this:

<ref><pubmed>XXXXX</ref></pubmed>

You have to give the reference a name, to do this change the first line like so:

<ref name="PMIDXXXXX"><pubmed>XXXXX</ref>

It's preferable to rename the reference under the PMID to avoid confusion. From there, to continue using the same reference you have to type and replace this simple line:

<ref name="PMIDXXXXX"/>

This will clean up the reference list and avoid the repeated reference. Note that if you reorganise page content, ensure that the first instance of the reference has the ref name tag <ref name="PMIDXXXXX">.

  • For all images you should put it in a thumb picture so you can provide a quick explanation and also use the reference line after that description. It should look like this:

[[File:picture.jpg|thumb|short description of picture being displayed<ref><pubmed>XXXXX</ref></pubmed>]]

  • All references should be directly after the full stop (it's a little format issue but will be noticed).
  • With the Further Reading section, add {{External Links}} to provide the disclaimer:

External Links Notice - The dynamic nature of the internet may mean that some of these listed links may no longer function. If the link no longer works search the web with the link text or name.

--Z3293267 (talk) 09:44, 23 May 2013 (EST)

Group 7

Introduction

  • Yes, it's obvious there's been an error with the first image, File:ElectronMicroLungMitochondria.jpg. The image could be missing from the database so you might have to catch up with Dr. Mark Hill to fix it or re-upload the same image under a different name.
  • It's clear and concise which should be the point for all introductions. I have an issue with the references which I have addressed further down.

Structure

  • I feel that definitely History should come directly after the Introduction.
  • Maybe this image should replace the Introduction as it looks a lot more simple.
  • A labelled image pointing out all the parts of the mitochondria would be good.
  • Have you considered a table format which could make it easier to read and label?

Function

  • Under Glycolysis, you shouldn't refer to first person.
  • You didn't explain what TCA stands for before abbreviating it.
  • The main function of mitochondria is to produce energy for the cell, I actually can't follow this section well to understand how that happens.
  • Doesn't mitochondria have multiple functions inside the cell besides producing energy?

History

  • As said before, would be better if it came directly after Introduction.
  • There's a good amount of dates spread out.
  • Maybe something after the year 2000.
  • I have issues with the references listed below.

During Cell Division

  • Shouldn't this section be more detailed? The whole 2013 group project is to do with cell division and it's only given a small section to relate back to the main topic. Does anything before cell division? Afterwards?
  • Needs an image to show the difference between retrograde and anterograde, I can understand if that can be difficult though.

Mitochondrial Fission and Fusion

  • I feel this sentence needs to be re-worded so I can understand the relationship to cell division, "enable the organelle to change in morphology, activity and distribution outside that of the regular cell replication and division process."
  • Fusion and Fission headings shouldn't be capitalised.

Physiological Significance of Mitochondrial Division

  • This is a good lead up from the previous heading Fission and Fusion.
  • Maybe rename the heading differently. Mitochondrial Abnormalities or Mitochondrial Diseases?
  • Should add a Current and Future Research section.

Formatting Issues

  • You need at least one student drawn picture.

"Note that the group project requires the inclusion of at least one student drawn image (from the group)."

Refer to this part of the website for tips: http://cellbiology.med.unsw.edu.au/cellbiology/index.php?title=Cell_Biology_Image_Tutorial#Making_Your_Own_Image

  • For all images you should put it in a thumb picture so you can provide a quick explanation and also use the reference line after that description. It should look like this:

[[File:picture.jpg|thumb|short description of picture being displayed<ref><pubmed>XXXXX</ref></pubmed>]]

  • All references should be directly after the full stop (it's a little format issue but will be noticed).
  • Needs more images, I know it can be hard finding images with copyright being the main issue but there are other ways to get some relevant pictures.
    • The content of the wiki should demonstrate to the reader that your group has researched adequately on this topic and covered the key areas necessary to inform your peers in their learning.
    • Evidence of significant research relating to basic and applied sciences that goes beyond the formal teaching activities.

But it's a tad overboard. Look at the History section under 1955. It has 5 references glued together! Looking at the sources it's all from the same book but each source was from a different volume. Was it really necessary to label all 5 volumes for two sentences?

Looking at reference 1, in the Intro alone it's repeated 3 times! And again with the Anterograde section, 4 times! These are all repeated in the one single paragraph too. Dr. Mark Hill clearly said, he absolutely hates the same reference repeated endlessly in a short amount of time and there's a good chance you might lose marks from doing this.

I know whoever did this must of spent a lot of time and effort, but I am genuinely concerned it might have done more harm than good.

--Z3293267 (talk) 01:24, 23 May 2013 (EST)
  1. U Gottstein, A W Seel Antihypertensive therapy in stroke patients. Acta Neurol. Scand., Suppl.c: 1977, 64;174-5 PubMed 268776