User:Z3254758

From CellBiology

Lab Attendance

--z3254758 15:12, 8 March 2012 (EST)

--z3254758 14:09, 15 March 2012 (EST)

--z3254758 15:20, 22 March 2012 (EST)

--z3254758 14:51, 29 March 2012 (EST)

--z3254758 14:04, 5 April 2012 (EST)

--z3254758 14:20, 19 April 2012 (EST)

--z3254758 14:01, 26 April 2012 (EST)

--z3254758 14:05, 3 May 2012 (EST)

--z3254758 14:06, 10 May 2012 (EST)

--z3254758 14:19, 24 May 2012 (EST)

--z3254758 14:21, 31 May 2012 (EST)

Lab 1

Hello

http://www.jove.com/basic

JOVE

Lecture 2

PubMed

Timetable


Lab 2

Nucleus cell extract fragment apoptosis.jpg

YA Lazebnik, S Cole, CA Cooke, WG Nelson, WC Earnshaw, 1993. Nuclear events of apoptosis in vitro in cell-free mitotic extracts: a model system for analysis of the active phase of apoptosis. Journal of Cell Biology. 123:7-22.<pubmed>8408207</pubmed>


Rockefeller University Press Copyright Policy This article is distributed under the terms of an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike–No Mirror Sites license for the first six months after the publication date (see http://www.jcb.org/misc/terms.shtml). After six months it is available under a Creative Commons License (Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported license, as described at http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/).


--Mark Hill 12:48, 20 March 2012 (EST) Please look at your page in edit mode and see below how I have formatted the reference and JCB copyright information correctly. Please also do this with the file (image) information.

<pubmed>8408207</pubmed>


Rockefeller University Press Copyright Policy This article is distributed under the terms of an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike–No Mirror Sites license for the first six months after the publication date (see http://www.jcb.org/misc/terms.shtml). After six months it is available under a Creative Commons License (Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported license, as described at http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/).



Identify a reference article that uses the "superresolution" microscopy technique.

Tønnesen, J., Nadrigny, F., Willig, K., Wedlich-Söldner, R., Nägerl, U., 2011. Two-color STED microscopy of living synapses using a single laser-beam pair. Biophysical Journal, 101(10), 2545-52.

What did the paper show that normal microscopy could not show. This paper demonstrates the use of the superresolution microscopy technique to examine synapses in living-brain slices. "Synapses, which are very small, highly dynamic, and embedded in brain tissue" would not be able to be viewed using normal microscopy techniques.

Lab 3

Acetone-

The following information is from the Chem Alert SDS for Acetone (008).

Properties

Appearance CLEAR COLOURLESS LIQUID

Solubility (water) SOLUBLE

Odour SLIGHT ODOUR Specific gravity 0.791

pH NOT AVAILABLE

% Volatiles NOT AVAILABLE

Vapour pressure NOT AVAILABLE

Flammability HIGHLY FLAMMABLE

Vapour density NOT AVAILABLE

Flash Point -17°C (cc)

Boiling point 50°C Upper Explosion Limit 13 %

Melting point -94°C Lower Explosion Limit 2.15 %


Health Hazard Summary

Low to moderate toxicity - irritant. This product has the potential to cause adverse health effects with over exposure. Use safe work practices to avoid eye or skin contact and inhalation. Over exposure may result in central nervous system (CNS) depression, with nausea, dizziness and unconsciousness at high levels. Possible risk or irreversible effects. May cause harm to the unborn child. Possible risk of impaired fertility. Danger of cumulative effects.


Eye Irritant- Contact may result in irritation, lacrimation, pain and redness. Prolonged contact may result in corneal burns.


Inhalation Irritant- Over exposure may result in irritation of the nose and throat, coughing, nausea, vomiting, weakness and headache. High level exposure may result in dizziness, drowsiness, incoordination and unconsciousness.


Skin Irritant- Contact may result in drying and defatting of the skin, rash and dermatitis. May be absorbed through skin with harmful effects.


Ingestion- Low to moderate toxicity. Ingestion may result in gastrointestinal irritation, nausea, vomiting, headache and weakness. Ingestion of large quantities may result in dizziness, drowsiness, kidney damage, unconsciousness and coma.

Lab 4

--z3254758 14:56, 29 March 2012 (EST)

Musashi (in Homo sapiens) information

Musashi is a neural RNA-binding protein found in CNS stem cells and neural progenitor cells[1]. It regulates the self-renewal of neural stem cells, represses translation in target mRNAs[2] and regulates asymmetric cell division in sensory organ precursor cells[3]. MSI1 was first found in 1998[4].

Musashi was found in Drosophila in 1994[5].

Musashi Polyclonal Antibody from Thermo Scientific

Polyclonal antibody (from rabbit) which is reactive with humans, murinae, rats and zebrafish. Can be used for Western Blot (dilution- 1:1000) and Immunofluorescence (dilution- 1:25). It has a molecular weight of 35 kDa.

Alexa Fluor® 488 Goat Anti-Rabbit IgG (H+L) *2 mg⁄mL*


Lab 6

Gif Cell bio lab 19.GIF


Lab 7

Abnormal Function

Excised human breast tissue, showing a stellate area of cancer 2cm in diameter. The lesion could be felt clinically as a hard mobile lump, not attached to skin or chest wall. The histology was that of a moderately well differentiated duct carcinoma Copyright Information


A hand affected by rheumatoid arthritis Copyright Information
Disease Description VEGF-A Relationship Treatment Prognosis Image References (temporary)
Diabetic Retinopathy A complication of diabetes affecting the retina. Possibly leads to complete blindness.

Two types-Nonproliferative retinopathy-characteristic microangiopathy, edema, microaneurysms, haemorrhaging, exudates and venous dilations, in the retina.

Proliferative retinopathy-haemorrhaging, capillary rupture, and retinal detachment are commonly observed

Rheumatoid arthritis Inflammatory disease of the synovial membrane. Most commonly impacts small joints in the hands and feet. According to the American College of Rheumatology, patients must exhibit at least four of the following criteria to be diagnosed-

• morning stiffness lasting at least 1 hour • swelling in three or more joints • swelling in hand joints • symmetric joint swelling • erosions or decalcification on x-ray of hand • rheumatoid nodules • abnormal serum rheumatoid factor.

Rheumatoid Arthritis

National Clinical Guideline for Management and Treatment in Adults NICE Clinical Guidelines, No. 79 2009

Breast cancer Malignant cancer cells form in the breast tissue PDQ Cancer Information Summaries. Bethesda (MD): National Cancer Institute (US); 2002-. Breast Cancer Prevention (PDQ®) [Updated 2011 Sep 30].
Age-related macular degeneration In developed countries, Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is responsible for the most cases of vision-loss (Kansagara et al 2012).

In the initial stages, patients experience a loss of central vision.

Abnormal blood vessels develop under the retina, at the centre of the macula (Informed Health Online 2011). Kansagara D, Gleitsmann K, Gillingham M, et al. Nutritional Supplements for Age-Related Macular Degeneration: A Systematic Review [Internet]. Washington (DC): Department of Veterans Affairs (US); 2012 Jan. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY.


Informed Health Online [Internet]. Cologne, Germany: Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG); 2006-. Age-related macular degeneration: Can thermal laser therapy help slow down vision loss? 2008 Apr 4 [Updated 2011 May 24].

Angiosarcoma
Pulmonary emphysema
Motor neuron disease Initial degeneration of the upper and lower motor neurons leads to weakness of muscles in the abdnominal, bulbar, limb, and thoracic regions. Respiratory capacity is decreased due to impairment of the respiratory muscles. This deterioration often leads to death. Centre for Clinical Practice at NICE (UK). Motor Neurone Disease: The Use of Non-Invasive Ventilation in the Management of Motor Neurone Disease. London: National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (UK); 2010 Jul. (NICE Clinical Guidelines, No. 105.) Introduction.

Lab 8

1. Identify a mammalian cell line in the ATCC catalogue (and add a link)

IRR-3T3 (irradiated 3T3-Swiss albino cells)

2. Identify the original tissue of origin of that cell line.

Mus musculus embryo

3. Identify the original paper that characterised the properties of that cell line.

<pubmed>13985244</pubmed>

References

  1. <pubmed>9790759</pubmed>
  2. <pubmed>18481998</pubmed>
  3. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S001448270500090X
  4. <pubmed>9790759</pubmed>
  5. <pubmed>8043282</pubmed>


Lab 9

<pubmed>20511054</pubmed> <pubmed>18697776</pubmed>




--Mark Hill 12:37, 17 May 2012 (EST) You have not completed the peer assessment process yet. If you have made comments on each project page they need also to be pasted here today for me to include in your individual assessment.


Group 3-

- at first was overwhelmed by how bulky the intro is but it's well written and provided a great base for the rest of your page

- history- perhaps you could briefly explain why some of those events are important

-signalling pathways- do the numbers indicate something about the proteins? If not, bullet points?

-fas mediated apoptosis- A brief explanation should come before the complex specifics. The current format doesn't provide context making it difficult to digest the information

-function- good explanations. The tone of this section is very casual and is more appropriate for a verbal presentation

-current research seems good! Maybe some more on dysfunction


Group 1- testosterone -Many grammatical errors and poor syntax in some sections

-classical pathway table is a good idea but needs an explanation of what you're actually trying to convey. Might be more useful in "signalling pathway" section 

- history is very extensive! Interesting info and presentation makes it easy to read.

-a diagram/flowchart might be more effective for expressing the information about biosynthesis

-layout and formatting is good in Regulation. Maybe consider rephrasing the first sentence

- signalling pathways- "Those outlined below have actions that affect the other"- what is "the other" ?

-the student drawn image is very impressive!

- "Testosterone has many functions during the adulthood life in both sexes. As mentioned previously the effect in males is much more than females" why do you need to repeat this? It doesn't appear to help this section in any way

-a lot of research has obviously gone in to abnormal function and clinical uses

-the layout of Current and ongoing research confused me and as a result did not express your message effectively

-overall well researched and presented

Lab 12

<pubmed>22935474</pubmed>

<pubmed>19667166</pubmed>

<pubmed>21430387</pubmed>


Microarray

  1. Identify a current technique used in gene sequencing.

microarray

  2. Identify a recent cell biology research paper that has used microarray technology.

<pubmed>22639738</pubmed>

  3. What aspect of the research findings were contributed by the microarray technique. 

Microarrays were used to analyse changes in the expression of over 26000 gene probes from cultured cardiomyocytes of H9C2 Cells.

Good

<pubmed>17634462</pubmed>

<pubmed>3126987</pubmed>- this is kind of interesting because it looks at vit D deficiency in populations where cultural behaviours significantly limit sun exposure.

<pubmed>16529140</pubmed>

<pubmed>1385673</pubmed>- this is a bit older, but I included it because it suggests that most populations still need dietary supplementation regardless of your sun exposure. Most subjects appear to be caucasion though.

<pubmed>2912737</pubmed>- general stuff

<pubmed>3361015</pubmed>- this might be going a bit too left field but I wonder if it's worth looking at whether with sufficient dietary vit D intake, it can counterbalance lack of sun exposure?

<pubmed>3206624</pubmed>- more about child sun exposure, rickets and demineralisation.

<pubmed>3095488</pubmed>- very low prevalence of vit D deficiency in men from Tobago (lots of skin pigmentation and sun exposure)

Maybe <pubmed>3366629</pubmed> <pubmed></pubmed> <pubmed></pubmed> <pubmed></pubmed>




<pubmed>17634462</pubmed>

<pubmed>21608424</pubmed>- this is kind of interesting because it looks at vit D deficiency in populations where cultural behaviours significantly limit sun exposure.

<pubmed>16529140</pubmed>

<pubmed>1385673</pubmed>- this is a bit older, but I included it because it suggests that most populations still need dietary supplementation regardless of your sun exposure. Most subjects appear to be caucasion though.

Vitamin D Deficiency in Adults: When to Test and How to Treat Mayo Clin Proc. 2010 August; 85(8): 752–758.

general stuff 

<pubmed>21697298</pubmed>- this might be going a bit too left field but I wonder if it's worth looking at whether with sufficient dietary vit D intake, it can counterbalance lack of sun exposure?

<pubmed>18524739</pubmed>- more about child sun exposure, rickets and demineralisation.

<pubmed>21462735</pubmed>- very low prevalence of vit D deficiency in men from Tobago (lots of skin pigmentation and sun exposure)

<pubmed>18088161</pubmed>